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Stop Niching Down. Start Niching Deep

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Stop Niching Down. Start Niching Deep

Being a tax and accounting professional is tough. In a world where it seems that everyone and their brother is a tax preparer, it can feel next to impossible to stand out from the crowd, especially if you’re serving a wide range of clients. 

Are you stuck in a generalist mindset, working way too many hours with clients from differing demographics? Have you sacrificed your personal life and passions just to make ends meet financially? It's time to rethink your approach.

The Pain of Being a Generalist

As a tax or accounting professional, you might think that casting a wide net will bring in more clients. However, being a generalist often leads to more problems than solutions:

  • Overwhelming Workload: Juggling clients from various industries with different needs can be exhausting and time-consuming. It’s like starting from scratch every time you do a consultation or sit down to file a tax return.
  • Lack of Specialization: Without a specific focus, it’s challenging to develop deep expertise in any one area, which can limit the value you provide to clients. Pro Tip: Tax clients who own businesses are also usually willing to pay more for service providers who have expertise in their industries, so marketing yourself as a generalist can harm your financial prospects right off the bat.
  • Generic Messaging: Broad, unfocused marketing messages fail to resonate with potential clients, making it harder to stand out in a crowded market. People are inundated with dozens – if not hundreds – of advertisements every day. In order to catch their interest, you have to offer something that actually matters.
  • Client Dissatisfaction: When you try to be everything to everyone, you risk not meeting the specific needs of any one client group, leading to lower satisfaction and retention rates. You may also lose out on important referrals.

Why Your Messaging Isn't Working

“But wait,” you might be thinking, “I’ve already niched down and it still doesn’t feel like it’s working!” There’s a reason for that. Sometimes, general niches, like “small business owners” or “people nearing retirement,” still result in content that is too broad and generic. 

This approach overlooks the deeper motivations and needs of your real target audience, resulting in marketing collateral that misses the mark from an engagement standpoint.

The Power of Niching Deep

Niching deep means going beyond the surface level of defining your target audience. Instead of focusing on broad categories, consider into the specific needs, challenges, and desires of a well-defined group. This allows you to create content and services that truly resonate with your demographic, making your messaging more impactful and your services more valuable.

Examples of Niching Deep

Let's explore some examples to illustrate the difference between niching down and niching deep:

Niche Down: Women who want to plan for retirement.

Niche Deep: Women ages 35-55 who are the primary breadwinners, struggling with raising kids and managing their careers, seeking flexible tax and financial plans to keep their retirement goals on track without losing time with family.

Example: Create content that addresses the unique challenges faced by these women, such as balancing work and family life, and offer solutions like flexible retirement plans and time-saving financial strategies.

Niche Down: Virtual CFO services.

Niche Deep: Virtual CFO services for restaurant entrepreneurs who want to improve cash flow, cut labor costs, plan for retirement, and get some personal time back.

Example: Develop case studies and blog posts that highlight how your virtual CFO services have helped restaurant owners streamline their operations, reduce costs, and achieve a better work-life balance.

Niche Down: Tax planning for small businesses.

Niche Deep: Tax planning for small business owners in the tech industry who are navigating rapid growth, seeking strategies to minimize tax liabilities while reinvesting in their business.

Example: Write articles and guides on tax strategies specifically for tech startups, including tips on reinvesting profits and leveraging tax incentives for research and development.

Niche Down: Accounting services for freelancers.

Niche Deep: Accounting services for creative freelancers who juggle multiple projects and clients, looking for streamlined financial management and tax strategies to maximize their income and free up time for their craft.

Example: Offer webinars and resources tailored to creative freelancers, focusing on efficient financial management and tax-saving tips that allow them to focus more on their creative work.

Niche Down: Estate planning.

Niche Deep: Estate planning for high-net-worth individuals who are concerned about preserving wealth for future generations, seeking comprehensive strategies that include tax minimization, asset protection, and charitable giving.

Example: Provide detailed guides and consultations on advanced estate planning techniques, including trusts, charitable donations, and tax-efficient wealth transfer strategies.

Niche Down: Financial planning for young professionals.

Niche Deep: Financial planning for young professionals in the medical field who are dealing with student loan debt, seeking advice on managing their finances while planning for future investments and family life.

Example: Create content that addresses the specific financial challenges faced by medical professionals, such as managing student loans and planning for long-term investments and family expenses.

Niche Down: Bookkeeping services.

Niche Deep: Bookkeeping services for e-commerce businesses that need help managing their inventory, tracking sales across multiple platforms, and ensuring accurate financial records for tax purposes.

Example: Develop tutorials and tools that help e-commerce business owners streamline their bookkeeping processes, manage inventory effectively, and prepare accurate financial reports.

How to Execute on Niching Deep

Executing a niching deep strategy requires some time and careful planning. But the more effort you put into developing a tax and accounting niche you love, the more lucrative your practice is likely to be in the future. Let’s take a look::

  • Identify Your Ideal Client: Understand who they are, what they need, and what challenges they face.
  • Develop Targeted Content: Create content that speaks directly to the specific needs and desires of your ideal client. This may mean blog posts, social media posts, live webinars, or e-books.
  • Offer Specialized Services: Tailor your services to address the unique challenges of your niche. If, for example, you specifically want to focus on pediatricians, do a deep dive into the tax and accounting problems pediatric medical offices typically face. Then, create online ads that solve a key pain point.
  • Engage with Your Audience: Build relationships with your audience through personalized communication and targeted marketing efforts.

Need Help Executing on This Plan?

That is what our unique marketing concierge program is all about. We help you pinpoint the best niche for you and how to message that niche for a deep connection.

Want to learn how we do this for you?

Click here to schedule a call with one of our strategists.

It’s Time to Get Started

Niching isn't about limiting yourself; it's about being intentional with your messaging. You can still talk about all the things you're passionate about, but by focusing on a specific person—your ideal audience—you'll find that your messaging resonates more deeply. This connection is what turns prospects into a loyal community and eventually clients.

By niching deep, you can create more meaningful connections with your audience, provide more valuable services, and ultimately grow your business more effectively. Don't settle for broad, generic messaging. Dive deep into the specific needs and desires of your ideal clients and watch your business thrive.

Did you find these examples helpful? Then let's chat!

Schedule a demo with us today.

Guide

Stop Niching Down. Start Niching Deep

Being a tax and accounting professional is tough. In a world where it seems that everyone and their brother is a tax preparer, it can feel next to impossible to stand out from the crowd, especially if you’re serving a wide range of clients. 

Are you stuck in a generalist mindset, working way too many hours with clients from differing demographics? Have you sacrificed your personal life and passions just to make ends meet financially? It's time to rethink your approach.

The Pain of Being a Generalist

As a tax or accounting professional, you might think that casting a wide net will bring in more clients. However, being a generalist often leads to more problems than solutions:

  • Overwhelming Workload: Juggling clients from various industries with different needs can be exhausting and time-consuming. It’s like starting from scratch every time you do a consultation or sit down to file a tax return.
  • Lack of Specialization: Without a specific focus, it’s challenging to develop deep expertise in any one area, which can limit the value you provide to clients. Pro Tip: Tax clients who own businesses are also usually willing to pay more for service providers who have expertise in their industries, so marketing yourself as a generalist can harm your financial prospects right off the bat.
  • Generic Messaging: Broad, unfocused marketing messages fail to resonate with potential clients, making it harder to stand out in a crowded market. People are inundated with dozens – if not hundreds – of advertisements every day. In order to catch their interest, you have to offer something that actually matters.
  • Client Dissatisfaction: When you try to be everything to everyone, you risk not meeting the specific needs of any one client group, leading to lower satisfaction and retention rates. You may also lose out on important referrals.

Why Your Messaging Isn't Working

“But wait,” you might be thinking, “I’ve already niched down and it still doesn’t feel like it’s working!” There’s a reason for that. Sometimes, general niches, like “small business owners” or “people nearing retirement,” still result in content that is too broad and generic. 

This approach overlooks the deeper motivations and needs of your real target audience, resulting in marketing collateral that misses the mark from an engagement standpoint.

The Power of Niching Deep

Niching deep means going beyond the surface level of defining your target audience. Instead of focusing on broad categories, consider into the specific needs, challenges, and desires of a well-defined group. This allows you to create content and services that truly resonate with your demographic, making your messaging more impactful and your services more valuable.

Examples of Niching Deep

Let's explore some examples to illustrate the difference between niching down and niching deep:

Niche Down: Women who want to plan for retirement.

Niche Deep: Women ages 35-55 who are the primary breadwinners, struggling with raising kids and managing their careers, seeking flexible tax and financial plans to keep their retirement goals on track without losing time with family.

Example: Create content that addresses the unique challenges faced by these women, such as balancing work and family life, and offer solutions like flexible retirement plans and time-saving financial strategies.

Niche Down: Virtual CFO services.

Niche Deep: Virtual CFO services for restaurant entrepreneurs who want to improve cash flow, cut labor costs, plan for retirement, and get some personal time back.

Example: Develop case studies and blog posts that highlight how your virtual CFO services have helped restaurant owners streamline their operations, reduce costs, and achieve a better work-life balance.

Niche Down: Tax planning for small businesses.

Niche Deep: Tax planning for small business owners in the tech industry who are navigating rapid growth, seeking strategies to minimize tax liabilities while reinvesting in their business.

Example: Write articles and guides on tax strategies specifically for tech startups, including tips on reinvesting profits and leveraging tax incentives for research and development.

Niche Down: Accounting services for freelancers.

Niche Deep: Accounting services for creative freelancers who juggle multiple projects and clients, looking for streamlined financial management and tax strategies to maximize their income and free up time for their craft.

Example: Offer webinars and resources tailored to creative freelancers, focusing on efficient financial management and tax-saving tips that allow them to focus more on their creative work.

Niche Down: Estate planning.

Niche Deep: Estate planning for high-net-worth individuals who are concerned about preserving wealth for future generations, seeking comprehensive strategies that include tax minimization, asset protection, and charitable giving.

Example: Provide detailed guides and consultations on advanced estate planning techniques, including trusts, charitable donations, and tax-efficient wealth transfer strategies.

Niche Down: Financial planning for young professionals.

Niche Deep: Financial planning for young professionals in the medical field who are dealing with student loan debt, seeking advice on managing their finances while planning for future investments and family life.

Example: Create content that addresses the specific financial challenges faced by medical professionals, such as managing student loans and planning for long-term investments and family expenses.

Niche Down: Bookkeeping services.

Niche Deep: Bookkeeping services for e-commerce businesses that need help managing their inventory, tracking sales across multiple platforms, and ensuring accurate financial records for tax purposes.

Example: Develop tutorials and tools that help e-commerce business owners streamline their bookkeeping processes, manage inventory effectively, and prepare accurate financial reports.

How to Execute on Niching Deep

Executing a niching deep strategy requires some time and careful planning. But the more effort you put into developing a tax and accounting niche you love, the more lucrative your practice is likely to be in the future. Let’s take a look::

  • Identify Your Ideal Client: Understand who they are, what they need, and what challenges they face.
  • Develop Targeted Content: Create content that speaks directly to the specific needs and desires of your ideal client. This may mean blog posts, social media posts, live webinars, or e-books.
  • Offer Specialized Services: Tailor your services to address the unique challenges of your niche. If, for example, you specifically want to focus on pediatricians, do a deep dive into the tax and accounting problems pediatric medical offices typically face. Then, create online ads that solve a key pain point.
  • Engage with Your Audience: Build relationships with your audience through personalized communication and targeted marketing efforts.

Need Help Executing on This Plan?

That is what our unique marketing concierge program is all about. We help you pinpoint the best niche for you and how to message that niche for a deep connection.

Want to learn how we do this for you?

Click here to schedule a call with one of our strategists.

It’s Time to Get Started

Niching isn't about limiting yourself; it's about being intentional with your messaging. You can still talk about all the things you're passionate about, but by focusing on a specific person—your ideal audience—you'll find that your messaging resonates more deeply. This connection is what turns prospects into a loyal community and eventually clients.

By niching deep, you can create more meaningful connections with your audience, provide more valuable services, and ultimately grow your business more effectively. Don't settle for broad, generic messaging. Dive deep into the specific needs and desires of your ideal clients and watch your business thrive.

Did you find these examples helpful? Then let's chat!

Schedule a demo with us today.

Practice Marketing

Stop Niching Down. Start Niching Deep

July 11, 2024
/
10
min read
Lee Reams
CEO | CountingWorks PRO

Being a tax and accounting professional is tough. In a world where it seems that everyone and their brother is a tax preparer, it can feel next to impossible to stand out from the crowd, especially if you’re serving a wide range of clients. 

Are you stuck in a generalist mindset, working way too many hours with clients from differing demographics? Have you sacrificed your personal life and passions just to make ends meet financially? It's time to rethink your approach.

The Pain of Being a Generalist

As a tax or accounting professional, you might think that casting a wide net will bring in more clients. However, being a generalist often leads to more problems than solutions:

  • Overwhelming Workload: Juggling clients from various industries with different needs can be exhausting and time-consuming. It’s like starting from scratch every time you do a consultation or sit down to file a tax return.
  • Lack of Specialization: Without a specific focus, it’s challenging to develop deep expertise in any one area, which can limit the value you provide to clients. Pro Tip: Tax clients who own businesses are also usually willing to pay more for service providers who have expertise in their industries, so marketing yourself as a generalist can harm your financial prospects right off the bat.
  • Generic Messaging: Broad, unfocused marketing messages fail to resonate with potential clients, making it harder to stand out in a crowded market. People are inundated with dozens – if not hundreds – of advertisements every day. In order to catch their interest, you have to offer something that actually matters.
  • Client Dissatisfaction: When you try to be everything to everyone, you risk not meeting the specific needs of any one client group, leading to lower satisfaction and retention rates. You may also lose out on important referrals.

Why Your Messaging Isn't Working

“But wait,” you might be thinking, “I’ve already niched down and it still doesn’t feel like it’s working!” There’s a reason for that. Sometimes, general niches, like “small business owners” or “people nearing retirement,” still result in content that is too broad and generic. 

This approach overlooks the deeper motivations and needs of your real target audience, resulting in marketing collateral that misses the mark from an engagement standpoint.

The Power of Niching Deep

Niching deep means going beyond the surface level of defining your target audience. Instead of focusing on broad categories, consider into the specific needs, challenges, and desires of a well-defined group. This allows you to create content and services that truly resonate with your demographic, making your messaging more impactful and your services more valuable.

Examples of Niching Deep

Let's explore some examples to illustrate the difference between niching down and niching deep:

Niche Down: Women who want to plan for retirement.

Niche Deep: Women ages 35-55 who are the primary breadwinners, struggling with raising kids and managing their careers, seeking flexible tax and financial plans to keep their retirement goals on track without losing time with family.

Example: Create content that addresses the unique challenges faced by these women, such as balancing work and family life, and offer solutions like flexible retirement plans and time-saving financial strategies.

Niche Down: Virtual CFO services.

Niche Deep: Virtual CFO services for restaurant entrepreneurs who want to improve cash flow, cut labor costs, plan for retirement, and get some personal time back.

Example: Develop case studies and blog posts that highlight how your virtual CFO services have helped restaurant owners streamline their operations, reduce costs, and achieve a better work-life balance.

Niche Down: Tax planning for small businesses.

Niche Deep: Tax planning for small business owners in the tech industry who are navigating rapid growth, seeking strategies to minimize tax liabilities while reinvesting in their business.

Example: Write articles and guides on tax strategies specifically for tech startups, including tips on reinvesting profits and leveraging tax incentives for research and development.

Niche Down: Accounting services for freelancers.

Niche Deep: Accounting services for creative freelancers who juggle multiple projects and clients, looking for streamlined financial management and tax strategies to maximize their income and free up time for their craft.

Example: Offer webinars and resources tailored to creative freelancers, focusing on efficient financial management and tax-saving tips that allow them to focus more on their creative work.

Niche Down: Estate planning.

Niche Deep: Estate planning for high-net-worth individuals who are concerned about preserving wealth for future generations, seeking comprehensive strategies that include tax minimization, asset protection, and charitable giving.

Example: Provide detailed guides and consultations on advanced estate planning techniques, including trusts, charitable donations, and tax-efficient wealth transfer strategies.

Niche Down: Financial planning for young professionals.

Niche Deep: Financial planning for young professionals in the medical field who are dealing with student loan debt, seeking advice on managing their finances while planning for future investments and family life.

Example: Create content that addresses the specific financial challenges faced by medical professionals, such as managing student loans and planning for long-term investments and family expenses.

Niche Down: Bookkeeping services.

Niche Deep: Bookkeeping services for e-commerce businesses that need help managing their inventory, tracking sales across multiple platforms, and ensuring accurate financial records for tax purposes.

Example: Develop tutorials and tools that help e-commerce business owners streamline their bookkeeping processes, manage inventory effectively, and prepare accurate financial reports.

How to Execute on Niching Deep

Executing a niching deep strategy requires some time and careful planning. But the more effort you put into developing a tax and accounting niche you love, the more lucrative your practice is likely to be in the future. Let’s take a look::

  • Identify Your Ideal Client: Understand who they are, what they need, and what challenges they face.
  • Develop Targeted Content: Create content that speaks directly to the specific needs and desires of your ideal client. This may mean blog posts, social media posts, live webinars, or e-books.
  • Offer Specialized Services: Tailor your services to address the unique challenges of your niche. If, for example, you specifically want to focus on pediatricians, do a deep dive into the tax and accounting problems pediatric medical offices typically face. Then, create online ads that solve a key pain point.
  • Engage with Your Audience: Build relationships with your audience through personalized communication and targeted marketing efforts.

Need Help Executing on This Plan?

That is what our unique marketing concierge program is all about. We help you pinpoint the best niche for you and how to message that niche for a deep connection.

Want to learn how we do this for you?

Click here to schedule a call with one of our strategists.

It’s Time to Get Started

Niching isn't about limiting yourself; it's about being intentional with your messaging. You can still talk about all the things you're passionate about, but by focusing on a specific person—your ideal audience—you'll find that your messaging resonates more deeply. This connection is what turns prospects into a loyal community and eventually clients.

By niching deep, you can create more meaningful connections with your audience, provide more valuable services, and ultimately grow your business more effectively. Don't settle for broad, generic messaging. Dive deep into the specific needs and desires of your ideal clients and watch your business thrive.

Did you find these examples helpful? Then let's chat!

Schedule a demo with us today.

Practice Marketing

Stop Niching Down. Start Niching Deep

July 11, 2024
/
10
min read
Lee Reams
CEO | CountingWorks PRO

Being a tax and accounting professional is tough. In a world where it seems that everyone and their brother is a tax preparer, it can feel next to impossible to stand out from the crowd, especially if you’re serving a wide range of clients. 

Are you stuck in a generalist mindset, working way too many hours with clients from differing demographics? Have you sacrificed your personal life and passions just to make ends meet financially? It's time to rethink your approach.

The Pain of Being a Generalist

As a tax or accounting professional, you might think that casting a wide net will bring in more clients. However, being a generalist often leads to more problems than solutions:

  • Overwhelming Workload: Juggling clients from various industries with different needs can be exhausting and time-consuming. It’s like starting from scratch every time you do a consultation or sit down to file a tax return.
  • Lack of Specialization: Without a specific focus, it’s challenging to develop deep expertise in any one area, which can limit the value you provide to clients. Pro Tip: Tax clients who own businesses are also usually willing to pay more for service providers who have expertise in their industries, so marketing yourself as a generalist can harm your financial prospects right off the bat.
  • Generic Messaging: Broad, unfocused marketing messages fail to resonate with potential clients, making it harder to stand out in a crowded market. People are inundated with dozens – if not hundreds – of advertisements every day. In order to catch their interest, you have to offer something that actually matters.
  • Client Dissatisfaction: When you try to be everything to everyone, you risk not meeting the specific needs of any one client group, leading to lower satisfaction and retention rates. You may also lose out on important referrals.

Why Your Messaging Isn't Working

“But wait,” you might be thinking, “I’ve already niched down and it still doesn’t feel like it’s working!” There’s a reason for that. Sometimes, general niches, like “small business owners” or “people nearing retirement,” still result in content that is too broad and generic. 

This approach overlooks the deeper motivations and needs of your real target audience, resulting in marketing collateral that misses the mark from an engagement standpoint.

The Power of Niching Deep

Niching deep means going beyond the surface level of defining your target audience. Instead of focusing on broad categories, consider into the specific needs, challenges, and desires of a well-defined group. This allows you to create content and services that truly resonate with your demographic, making your messaging more impactful and your services more valuable.

Examples of Niching Deep

Let's explore some examples to illustrate the difference between niching down and niching deep:

Niche Down: Women who want to plan for retirement.

Niche Deep: Women ages 35-55 who are the primary breadwinners, struggling with raising kids and managing their careers, seeking flexible tax and financial plans to keep their retirement goals on track without losing time with family.

Example: Create content that addresses the unique challenges faced by these women, such as balancing work and family life, and offer solutions like flexible retirement plans and time-saving financial strategies.

Niche Down: Virtual CFO services.

Niche Deep: Virtual CFO services for restaurant entrepreneurs who want to improve cash flow, cut labor costs, plan for retirement, and get some personal time back.

Example: Develop case studies and blog posts that highlight how your virtual CFO services have helped restaurant owners streamline their operations, reduce costs, and achieve a better work-life balance.

Niche Down: Tax planning for small businesses.

Niche Deep: Tax planning for small business owners in the tech industry who are navigating rapid growth, seeking strategies to minimize tax liabilities while reinvesting in their business.

Example: Write articles and guides on tax strategies specifically for tech startups, including tips on reinvesting profits and leveraging tax incentives for research and development.

Niche Down: Accounting services for freelancers.

Niche Deep: Accounting services for creative freelancers who juggle multiple projects and clients, looking for streamlined financial management and tax strategies to maximize their income and free up time for their craft.

Example: Offer webinars and resources tailored to creative freelancers, focusing on efficient financial management and tax-saving tips that allow them to focus more on their creative work.

Niche Down: Estate planning.

Niche Deep: Estate planning for high-net-worth individuals who are concerned about preserving wealth for future generations, seeking comprehensive strategies that include tax minimization, asset protection, and charitable giving.

Example: Provide detailed guides and consultations on advanced estate planning techniques, including trusts, charitable donations, and tax-efficient wealth transfer strategies.

Niche Down: Financial planning for young professionals.

Niche Deep: Financial planning for young professionals in the medical field who are dealing with student loan debt, seeking advice on managing their finances while planning for future investments and family life.

Example: Create content that addresses the specific financial challenges faced by medical professionals, such as managing student loans and planning for long-term investments and family expenses.

Niche Down: Bookkeeping services.

Niche Deep: Bookkeeping services for e-commerce businesses that need help managing their inventory, tracking sales across multiple platforms, and ensuring accurate financial records for tax purposes.

Example: Develop tutorials and tools that help e-commerce business owners streamline their bookkeeping processes, manage inventory effectively, and prepare accurate financial reports.

How to Execute on Niching Deep

Executing a niching deep strategy requires some time and careful planning. But the more effort you put into developing a tax and accounting niche you love, the more lucrative your practice is likely to be in the future. Let’s take a look::

  • Identify Your Ideal Client: Understand who they are, what they need, and what challenges they face.
  • Develop Targeted Content: Create content that speaks directly to the specific needs and desires of your ideal client. This may mean blog posts, social media posts, live webinars, or e-books.
  • Offer Specialized Services: Tailor your services to address the unique challenges of your niche. If, for example, you specifically want to focus on pediatricians, do a deep dive into the tax and accounting problems pediatric medical offices typically face. Then, create online ads that solve a key pain point.
  • Engage with Your Audience: Build relationships with your audience through personalized communication and targeted marketing efforts.

Need Help Executing on This Plan?

That is what our unique marketing concierge program is all about. We help you pinpoint the best niche for you and how to message that niche for a deep connection.

Want to learn how we do this for you?

Click here to schedule a call with one of our strategists.

It’s Time to Get Started

Niching isn't about limiting yourself; it's about being intentional with your messaging. You can still talk about all the things you're passionate about, but by focusing on a specific person—your ideal audience—you'll find that your messaging resonates more deeply. This connection is what turns prospects into a loyal community and eventually clients.

By niching deep, you can create more meaningful connections with your audience, provide more valuable services, and ultimately grow your business more effectively. Don't settle for broad, generic messaging. Dive deep into the specific needs and desires of your ideal clients and watch your business thrive.

Did you find these examples helpful? Then let's chat!

Schedule a demo with us today.

Lee Reams
CEO | CountingWorks PRO

As the founder and CEO of CountingWorks, Inc, Lee is passionate about helping independent tax and accounting professionals compete in the modern age. From time-saving digital onboarding tools, world-class websites, and outbound marketing campaigns, Lee has been developing best-in-class marketing solutions for over twenty years.

Lee Reams
CEO | CountingWorks PRO

As the founder and CEO of CountingWorks, Inc, Lee is passionate about helping independent tax and accounting professionals compete in the modern age. From time-saving digital onboarding tools, world-class websites, and outbound marketing campaigns, lee has been developing best-in-class marketing solutions for over twenty years.

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